Posted 1 hour ago
Posted 1 hour ago

thelovelyseas:

A Humpback Whale breaches from the calm waters of Alaska’s Inside Passage near Juneau at sunset, Chilkat Mountains and Admiralty Island beyond by Alaska Stock Images

(Source: thelovelyseas)

Posted 1 hour ago
Posted 1 hour ago
Posted 1 day ago
rhamphotheca:

Semen Says:
Scientists report for the first time that a snail’s seminal fluid proteins can suppress the mating success of the male side of its hermaphroditic partner.
by Rina Shaikh-Lesko
Although copulation is often brief, males of many animal species leave a lasting impression on their mates. The seminal fluid they deposit contains not just sperm, but proteins that can alter the physiology and behavior of the female, often in ways that hurt the paternal success of her subsequent mates.
Among hermaphrodites—animals with both male and female reproductive organs—mates themselves are potential competitors, too, and copulation gives seminal fluid proteins the unique opportunity to directly manipulate the recipient’s male as well as female function.
Ovipostatin, a seminal fluid protein (SFP) in the hermaphroditic freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis, cuts egg production in half in the sperm recipient, according to a 2010 study led by Joris Koene of VU University Amsterdam in the Netherlands.
It’s been theorized that SFPs might also affect the sperm-producing capacity of recipient snails—their maleness—to reduce competition within a population. “It had been predicted … more than 30 years ago, but no one had properly tested it,” says Koene…
(read more: The Scientist)
illustration: © Scott Leighton

rhamphotheca:

Semen Says:

Scientists report for the first time that a snail’s seminal fluid proteins can suppress the mating success of the male side of its hermaphroditic partner.

by Rina Shaikh-Lesko

Although copulation is often brief, males of many animal species leave a lasting impression on their mates. The seminal fluid they deposit contains not just sperm, but proteins that can alter the physiology and behavior of the female, often in ways that hurt the paternal success of her subsequent mates.

Among hermaphrodites—animals with both male and female reproductive organs—mates themselves are potential competitors, too, and copulation gives seminal fluid proteins the unique opportunity to directly manipulate the recipient’s male as well as female function.

Ovipostatin, a seminal fluid protein (SFP) in the hermaphroditic freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis, cuts egg production in half in the sperm recipient, according to a 2010 study led by Joris Koene of VU University Amsterdam in the Netherlands.

It’s been theorized that SFPs might also affect the sperm-producing capacity of recipient snails—their maleness—to reduce competition within a population. “It had been predicted … more than 30 years ago, but no one had properly tested it,” says Koene…

(read more: The Scientist)

illustration: © Scott Leighton

Posted 1 day ago

rhamphotheca:

Can Snowshoe Hares Evolve to Cope With Climate Change?

The color-changing North American animals may adapt by staying brown for longer periods.

by Emma Marris

There’s something odd about a bright white snowshoe hare motionless and alert—without any hint of snow nearby.

Gleaming white on a brown background of dirt and leaves, the hares, which are native to the mountain ranges of North America, might as well be wearing an “eat me” sign for lynx and other predators.

Scott Mills and Marketa Zimova of North Carolina State University call this “mismatch”—when the hare, which turns from brown to white as the fall becomes winter and back again in spring, doesn’t match its background.

Usually, hares seem to time their color change pretty well. Now the average hare is mismatched only about a week out of the year.But climate change is likely to make such awkward—and potentially fatal—mismatches much more common, the team said this week at the North America Congress for Conservation Biology in Missoula, Montana…

(read more: National Geographic)

photo by Robert Harding/World Imagery/ CORBIS

Posted 3 days ago

skunkbear:

ted:

Eerie, beautiful, captivating images of sea urchins mating and being born (that little triangle guy is a baby sea urchin).

These are a glimpse of how life begins in the deep ocean — and there’s a lot of life down there. The oceans provide about 190 times as much living space as every other space on Earth — soil, air and fresh water — put together. A vast array of amazing creatures live in the depths of this watery world. Squid, jellyfish, and plankton are just a few of our favorites (all shown as tiny babies in that last gif).

Learn more here »

Another great look at the alien world of the ocean. See closeups of coral here.

Posted 3 days ago

rhamphotheca:

What has been seen… cannot be unseen.

Posted 3 days ago

fairy-wren:

The Double Date (by Jeff Dyck)

*Wood Duck

Posted 3 days ago
Posted 3 days ago

zoologyillustration:

Painting all those fishies today.

Posted 4 days ago

artmonia:

  1. Copper Light
  2. Oregon Ladder

by Jeremy Miranda.

Posted 4 days ago

theworldcapturedthroughalens:

Santa Cruz tide pools. 

Santa Cruz, CA

I was just here!

Posted 1 week ago

Pascalle
our ends are beginnings

(Source: le0night)

Posted 1 week ago

strangebiology:

As millions of years pass, fish build on their basic design. The muscles around their backbone evolve into a powerful tail and fins appear. They evolve a distinct head. He may not look like you or I, but this odd fish is becoming a blueprint for our own bodies. 

Walking with Dinosaurs was popular enough to inspire a stage performance, many spin-offs, and now a re-make. My favorite of these is the prequel Walking with Monsters: Life Before Dinosaurs. It is a 3-part series that tells the tale of evolution and life in the Paleozoic. 

This is how we went from simple little swimming creatures to taking our first steps on land. A glorious moment in history.